Weekly news – 26 October 2018

Publikováno: 26. října 2018

This week we’ve been in Copenhagen, at the 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference – the world’s biggest gathering of the global movement against corruption.

More than 1,800 people from 144 countries attended the three-day event. Among the highlights were sessions on corruption and gender, technology, and the financial sector. Workshops also focused on activists working on corruption and human rights, environmental and LGBTQ+ issues.

The conference hosts, Danida, the Danish development cooperation agency, put together a high-level segment comprised of governments, business leaders and international organisations that individually and collectively committed to stamping out corruption.

We’ll be paying close attention to how well they live up to their pledges. As we heard time and again throughout the workshops and plenaries in Copenhagen, we have the laws, the commitments and the agreements; what we need now is action.

News from Transparency International

The 18th International Anti-corruption Conference: act now for development, peace and security

The 18th International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC), with the theme Together for development, peace and security: now is the time to act, concluded on Wednesday with a rallying cry from the anti-corruption movement: We are a global force and we will not be silenced.

Read the full Copenhagen Declaration below.

The Copenhagen Declaration – Stand together for peace, security and development

Anti-Corruption Award winners announced!

The late Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia and Spanish whistleblower and campaigner Ana Garrido Ramos are the winners of the 2018 Anti-Corruption Award.

New on Voices for Transparency

Are women less corrupt than men?

by Talita Corrêa

Despite the efforts of movements fighting for gender equality around the world, the presence of women as political leaders is still not significant. At the IACC in Copenhagen, experts discussed the influence of politically active women and how their participation affects anti-corruption efforts.

Could technology be an enabler of corruption?

by Manasseh Azure Awuni

Does technology enable perpetrators of corruption to cause more havoc? Or does it strengthen the arms of state actors, the media and anti-corruption activists?

 

Source: Transparency International

As we heard time and again throughout the workshops and plenaries in Copenhagen, we have the laws, the commitments and the agreements; what we need now is action.