Weekly news – 24 August 2018

Publikováno: 24. srpna 2018

This week has seen two big developments in the corruption scandal involving US President, Donald Trump.

Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, was found guilty of fraud. On the same day his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, pled guilty to fraud and campaign finance violations.

Manafort lied to banks to get millions of dollars in personal loans and hid millions in earnings from the US tax agency. He hid this money through setting up anonymous companies. These companies received payments from Ukrainian businessmen and paid them into Manafort’s personal bank accounts as if they were loans rather than income.

Anonymous companies hide the identity of their owners, making it hard to connect them with criminal activity. They are a common tool for laundering money and paying bribes, and Transparency International is pressuring governments to stop them.

Cohen admitted secretly paying two women during the 2016 presidential election campaign to stay quiet about their relationships with Trump. He claimed that Trump instructed himto make the payments, in violation of campaign finance laws.

These convictions led to renewed calls from opposition politicians to end corruption in US politics. Senator Elizabeth Warren proposed legislation to crack down on lobbying, stop people moving back and forth between elected government positions and corporate jobs, and force presidential candidates to reveal their tax returns. Warren said: “Corruption is a form of public cancer, and Washington’s got it bad.”

Corruption is a systemic problem and Americans think it’s getting worse. No matter which party tackles it, corruption must be removed from all aspects US society.

News from Transparency International

Madagascar government must take action on trafficking of precious wood

The current Madagascan project of selling thousands of stockpiled rosewood logs could reactivate dormant trafficking networks and enable illegal transactions to be made under cover of authorized transactions.

New on Voices For Transparency

What a difference two years makes: progress since the 2016 Anti-Corruption Summit

Each year governments make anti-corruption commitments at various international conferences and summits. Every summit is different, but afterwards we all grapple with the same problem: how to make sure commitments stick?

Opportunities

Registration for the 18th IACC is open!

Registration is now open for the upcoming International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC), which will take place from 22-24 October in Copenhagen, Denmark.

We are delighted to offer discounted Early Bird rates until 10 September 2018. Participation is limited – so secure yours and register as soon as possible!

 

Source: Transparency International

Anonymous companies hide the identity of their owners, making it hard to connect them with criminal activity. They are a common tool for laundering money and paying bribes, and Transparency International is pressuring governments to stop them.