Weekly news – 1 June 2018

Publikováno: 1. června 2018

This week, we zero in on Spain’s ongoing Gürtel corruption scandal, one of the largest in the country’s history. The affair implicates senior officials from the ruling right-wing People’s Party (PP) for taking bribes from Francisco Correa, a businessman with ties to the PP.

On 24 May, a Spanish court ruled that the PP profited from an illegal kickbacks-for-contracts scheme and Correa was sentenced to 51 years in prison.

Earlier this week, Spain’s opposition party filed a no confidence motion against the prime minister and leader of the PP, Mariano Rajoy. Today, Rajoy was ousted when the motion passed in parliament.

Unfortunately, Spain is no stranger to corruption scandals in recent years and, as in other European countries, public procurement is particularly vulnerable. Since 2012, the country lost eight points in the Corruption Perceptions Index, scoring worse than most Western democracies.

But it does not have to stay this way.

We urge political parties in Spain to come together to address the challenge of systemic corruption and stop treating the issue as part of an electoral power struggle. The problem is bigger than any one party.

News from Transparency International

Camouflaged cash: how ‘security votes’ fuel corruption in Nigeria

Ahead of the 2019 Presidential elections in Nigeria, Transparency International and the Civil Society Legislative Advocacy Center (CISLAC) are calling on candidates to commit to scrapping the unaccountable and secretive “security vote” spending – one of the most durable forms of corruption in Nigeria—saying that they fail to provide real security for citizens.

Anti-Corruption Award 2018 – Nominate someone!

Nominations for the Anti-Corruption Award 2018 are now OPEN! Our Anti-Corruption Award recognises the courage and determination of the many individuals and organisations fighting corruption around the world. Winners will be announced at the #18IACC this October in Copenhagen, Denmark. Nominate someone today!

New on Voices for Transparency

Rush for rocks, gold and palm oil — women document land corruption in Liberia

by Mary Hodgett (TIMBY)

In Liberia, two small communities are fighting to protect their homes and land rights against a powerful wave of environmentally destructive industries. Recognising the role that corruption plays in facilitating land grabbing and conflict, Transparency International is working with This is My Backyard (TIMBY) to design technology for communities in Africa to collect and share evidence about land tenure, environmental conservation and corruption.

Source: Transparency International

We urge political parties in Spain to come together to address the challenge of systemic corruption and stop treating the issue as part of an electoral power struggle. The problem is bigger than any one party.